August282014
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“I wake up in the middle of the night, and no matter where I am, I search for you. Whether it’s me searching for you in my bed with me, or checking my phone to see if you’re awake, I’m always looking for you. When I wake up for the day, I always text you good morning, even though I know you’re still sleeping. Throughout the day, I do things, I go about my day, and I see you in so many things. Sometimes I see you in the passenger seat of my car, sometimes I hear you in the music I listen to, sometimes the thought of you just makes me stop my day and embrace the fact that you’re with me. I would stop my day whenever, if it meant I could have some comfort in your memory. You make my day worth living. Sometimes I’m lucky enough to Skype with you and see your face, or call you and hear your voice, and those things I don’t take for granted. For the first time in my life, I’ve had a vivid picture of my future, the person I’m going to marry, and the life I’m going to live, and you’re apart of it. You’re the girl who changes everything” April 15, 2014 (via urmothafuxingnigga)

(via 3-2-1-lesbian)

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y0itskameron:

oh my god

y0itskameron:

oh my god

(Source: canujustnot, via 3-2-1-lesbian)

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(Source: fatcatsquad, via 3-2-1-lesbian)

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(Source: , via underpopulated)

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(Source: faantasmic, via lovenevrrrgivesup)

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(Source: lizgillies, via lovenevrrrgivesup)

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Nicki Minaj is not a woman who easily slides into the roles assigned to women in her industry or elsewhere. She’s not polished, she’s not concerned with her reputation, and she’s certainly not fighting for equality among mainstream second-wave feminists. She’s something else, and she’s something equally worth giving credence to: a boundary-breaker, a nasty bitch, a self-proclaimed queen, a self-determined and self-made artist. She’s one of the boys, and she does it with the intent to subvert what it means. She sings about sexy women, about fucking around with different men. She raps about racing ahead in the game, imagines up her own strings of accolades, and rolls with a rap family notorious for dirty rhymes, foul mouths, and disregard for authority and hegemony.

While Beyoncé has expanded feminist discourse by reveling in her role as a mother and wife while also fighting for women’s rights, Minaj has been showing her teeth in her climb to the top of a male-dominated genre. Both, in the process, have expanded our society’s idea of what an empowered women looks like — but Minaj’s feminist credentials still frequently come under fire. To me, it seems like a clear-cut case of respectability politics and mainstreaming of the feminist movement: while feminist writers raved over Beyoncé’s latest album and the undertones of sexuality and empowerment that came with it, many have questioned Minaj’s decisions over the years to subvert beauty norms using her own body, graphically talk dirty in her work, and occasionally declare herself dominant in discourse about other women. (All of these areas of concern, however, didn’t seem to come into play when Queen Bey did the same.)

Nicki Minaj’s Feminism Isn’t About Your Comfort Zone: On “Anaconda” and Respectability Politics | Autostraddle (via becauseiamawoman)

My two queens are both killin it

(via kisslng)

(via hottumn)

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